Top 10 universities in South East Asia,Malaysia not in!


According to Webometric Ranking of World Universities, the Top 10 universities in South-East of Asia are:
National University of Singapore

1. NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF SINGAPORE
2. NANYANG TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY , SINGAPORE
3. KASETSART UNIVERSITY , THAILAND
4. CHULALONGKORN UNIVERSITY , THAILAND
5. PRINCE OF SONGKLA UNIVERSITY , THAILAND
6. ASIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY , THAILAND
7. CHIANG MAI UNIVERSITY , THAILAND
8. THAMMASAT UNIVERSITY , THAILAND
9. ASSUMPTION UNIVERSITY OF THAILAND
10. KHON KAEN UNIVERSITY, THAILAND


Out of the top 10 ranking South East Asia universities, 2 are from Singapore , and the balance 8 universities are from Thailand . Also, on the Top 100 list, Thailand has 41 universities, Myanmar 18, Indonesia 14, the Philippines 13, and Singapore 7.

In Asia , the Top 10 universities are :

1. UNIVERSITY OF TOKYO
2. NATIONAL TAIWAN UNIVERSITY
3. KYOTO UNIVERSITY
4. BEIJING UNIVERSITY
5. KEIO UNIVERSITY
6. NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF SINGAPORE
7. UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG
8. CHINESE UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG
9. NATIONAL CHIAO TUNG UNIVERSITY
10. NAGOYA UNIVERSITY

Out of the Top 10 ranking universities in ASIA, 4 are from Japan, 5 are from China, and the remaining 1 is from Singapore . We are also nowhere near the Top 100 universities in Asia . In terms of Global Ranking, None of Malaysia ‘s universities are anywhere near the TOP 1000 universities.

Well, the fact speaks for itself ! Thailand, Myanmar, Indonesia, Philippines, and Singapore are way ahead of Malaysia . Despite all our constant shouting of Malaysia boleh this and that, and all the emotional rhetoric of shiok sendiri and self denials, we are already an academic backwaters nation in South East Asia , we shake our heads…

We have always personally railed against Man’s dependency on numeric evidence as proof of superiority but before we get too ahead with this argument, let us explain.

‘Numeric evidence’ means the use of numbers to represent one’s status. If you have $500,000 and I have $100, you are wealthier than I or so the numeric evidence suggests. If you have a 5-litre engine motorcar, it is definitely a better car than my 1.6-litre car or so the numeric evidence suggests. If you have 10 titles bestowed on your life by the Sultan and the King, you are most assuredly a better person than most of us are.

And so it goes that if a student scores an exemplary number of distinctions (A’s in Malaysia ) in a public exam, he/she is considered the pinnacle of what the country’s education system is capable of producing. He/she is expected to go through tertiary education anywhere in the world with flushing success. So what could possibly have happened if she fails abroad?

Malaysia‘s education system has always been a laughing stock.

Based purely on numeric superiority and mindless rote learning methods that even the British has long abandoned decades earlier, Malaysia continues to believe that the more A’s a student attains, the better equipped he/she is. It doesn’t matter how he/she gets the A’s so long as the aim is to get them and get as many in the process. So if the student were to labour over numerous past year exam papers in the library, memorise the answers and focus only on what the teacher ‘suggests’ are likely to come out for the exam, that’s alright by everyone. The education system doesn’t teach the students to UNDERSTAND the material. It doesn’t encourage proactive teaching methods that encourage students to discover knowledge but to merely be taught.

When a student with 17 Distinctions fail in the real world, it is not a surprise. Perhaps it is to many Malaysians, but it’s a system that is waiting to reward its students with spectacular failure when they leave the shores and compete overseas or when they enter the workforce. Many organisations in the private sector have continued to be horrified at the performance of such students during interviews. Communication skills are absent. Standard ethics are absent. Common courtesy codes are absent. Presentation skills as well as personal grooming are absent. What has the education system taught them?

If Malaysia continue to embark on the road of plain numeric superiority instead of to challenge the students to think, provoke them to create their own opinions and to communicate expressively, to eloquently define their standing in the world, there can never be an international leader in any field or industry emanating from Malaysia. It never produced one in the last 20 years. It never will for the next 100 years.

 FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009
The Failure of Nur Amalina (who scored 17As)
I was really shocked and speechless to be informed about Nur Amalina Che Bakri.

Nur Amalina had held briefly the record of the most A’s scored in the Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia. Upon the announcement of results of SPM 2004 on 26 March 2005, she received 17 1As – a record for number of A’s received by a student in the history of Malaysian education back then. She was sponsored by Bank Negara Malaysia to study medicine in the United Kingdom, and did her A-levels at the Cheltenham Ladies College in the UK.

Now I am informed that she had failed her second year medical study at the University of Edinburgh . I really hope this is not true……if it is, what went wrong?

Could English language be the problem? We are going back to Malay medium again and that means trouble.

God, please save Malaysia…!

“Life is a bunch of experiences and I am going to make it as incredible as possible”

Food for Thought: Top 10 universities in South-East of Asia ..!  Is it English?

Nanjing Massacre remembered!


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Photos: China Remembers the Nanjing Massacre

blogs.wsj.com

Events were staged Tuesday to remember the victims of the Nanjing massacre on its 74th anniversary. Occupied by Japanese troops on Dec. 13, 1937, China’s former southern capital city suffered a six-week massacre in which more than 300,000 were… Edit

Nanjing Massacre: 300,000 Chinese People Killed, 20,000 Women Raped …

Uploaded by on Nov 18, 2006

http://RapeofNanking.info Rape of Nanking – Nanjing Massacre. Japanse Atrocities in Asia. Part I of 2. This documentary, by Rhawn Joseph is based on 20 years research and consists entirely of archival photos and film-clips. This film begins with an overview of Japan and China at the beginning of the 20th Century, explains the mind-set of the Japanese and their God, Hirohito, and then continues with the invasion of China, the crimes committed by the Japanese (during the Fall) on the road to Nanjing, Nanjing Massacre, the rape of the Philipines, Unit 731, the Baatan death camps, Japanese denials, and the dropping of the A-bomb on Japan.

The purpose of this film is educational, and to explain the mind-set that led to a horrible crime: the torture and murder of 280,000 civilians by Japanese soldiers who took great pleasure in raping, bayonetting, beheading and burning people alive. We wish to emphasize: These crimes took place throughout Asia, and the Japanese planned the same for the White races as well, including America.

Those who do not learn from the past, are condemned to repeat it. The purpose of this film is, thus, educational. We have no hatred for the Japanese people.

This documentary is an independent production. We are not associated with and never received any financial help from the Chinese government or any group or organization. The film is completely independent. We have no political motives. We have no purpose and no other goal other than to create an interesting, provocative, educational movie that speaks to the mind and intellect, and which can speak to the heart and one’e emotions.

Credits: The English edition is narrated by Rhawn Joseph, Ph.D.. The film was produced, written, and edited by Rhawn Joseph, Ph.D. Additional Credits: Music. The musical soundtrack (all music is identified at the end of the film) was arranged and selected by R. Joseph, Ph.D., and was reproduced in this film courtesy of Arc Music Productions Int., LTD, United Kingdom; Nonsuch Records, Warner Music Group, Rhino Entertainment, New York. Sony Classical Music, New York.

Modern History Sourcebook:
The Nanking Massacre, 1937


The Japanese occupation of Nanking, the capital of the Republic of China, lead to one of the greatest horrors of the century . This eyewitness report was filed by a New York Times reporter.

Aboard the U.S.S. Oahu at Shanghai, Dec. 17 [1937].
Through wholesale atrocities and vandalism at Nanking the Japanese Army has thrown away a rare opportunity to gain the respect and confidence of the Chinese inhabitants and of foreign opinion there….

The killing of civilians was widespread. Foreigners who traveled widely through the city Wednesday found civilian dead on every street. Some of the victims were aged men, women and children.

Policemen and firemen were special objects of attack. Many victims were bayoneted and some of the wounds were barbarously cruel.

Any person who ran because of fear or excitement was likely to be killed on the spot as was any one caught by roving patrols in streets or alleys after dark. Many slayings were witnessed by foreigners.

The Japanese looting amounted almost to plundering of the entire city. Nearly every building was entered by Japanese soldiers, often under the eyes of their officers, and the men took whatever they wanted. The Japanese soldiers often impressed Chinese to carry their loot….

The mass executions of war prisoners added to the horrors the Japanese brought to Nanking. After killing the Chinese soldiers who threw down their arms and surrendered, the Japanese combed the city for men in civilian garb who were suspected of being former soldiers.

In one building in the refugee zone 400 men were seized. They were marched off, tied in batches of fifty, between lines of riflemen and machine gunners, to the execution ground.

Just before boarding the ship for Shanghai the writer watched the execution of 200 men on the Bund [dike]. The killings took ten minutes. The men were lined against a wall and shot. Then a number of Japanese, armed with pistols, trod nonchalantly around the crumpled bodies, pumping bullets into any that were still kicking.

The army men performing the gruesome job had invited navy men from the warships anchored off the Bund to view the scene. A large group of military spectators apparently greatly enjoyed the spectacle.

When the first column of Japanese troops marched from the South Gate up Chungshan Road toward the city’s Big Circle, small knots of Chinese civilians broke into scattering cheers, so great was their relief that the siege was over and so high were their hopes that the Japanese would restore peace and order. There are no cheers in Nanking now for the Japanese.

By despoiling the city and population the Japanese have driven deeper into the Chinese a repressed hatred that will smolder through tears as forms of the anti­Japanism that Tokyo professes to be fighting to eradicate from China.

The capture of Nanking was the most overwhelming defeat suffered by the Chinese and one of the most tragic military debacles in the history of modern warfare. In attempting to defend Nanking the Chinese allowed themselves to be surrounded and then systematically slaughtered….

The flight of the many Chinese soldiers was possible by only a few exits. Instead of sticking by their men to hold the invaders at bay with a few strategically placed units while the others withdrew, many army leaders deserted, causing panic among the rank and file.

Those who failed to escape through the gate leading to Hsiakwan and from there across the Yangtze were caught and executed….

When theJapanese captured Hsiakwan gate they cut off all exit from the city while at least a third of the Chinese Army still was within the walls.

Because of the disorganization of the Chinese a number of units continued fighting Tuesday noon, many of these not realizing the Japanese had surrounded them and that their cause was hopeless. Japanese tank patrols systematically eliminated these.

Tuesday morning, while attempting to motor to Hsiakwan, I encountered a desperate group of about twenty­five Chinese soldiers who were still holding the Ningpo Guild Building on Chungahan Road. They later surrendered.

Thousands of prisoners were executed by the Japanese. Most of the Chinese soldiers who had been interned in the safety zone were shot in masses. The city was combed in a systematic house­to­house search for men having knapsack marks on their shoulders or other signs of having been soldiers. They were herded together and executed.

Many were killed where they were found, including men innocent of any army connection and many wounded soldiers and civilians. I witnessed three mass executions of prisoners within a few hours Wednesday. In one slaughter a tank gun was turned on a group of more than 100 soldiers at a bomb shelter near the Ministry of Communications.

A favorite method of execution was to herd groups of a dozen men at entrances of dugout and to shoot them so the bodies toppled inside. Dirt then was shoveled in and the men buried.

Since the beginning of the Japanese assault on Nanking the city presented a frightful appearance. The Chinese facilities for the care of army wounded were tragically inadequate, so as early as a week ago injured men were seen often on the streets, some hobbling, others crawling along seeking treatment.

Civilian casualties also were heavy, amounting to thousands. The only hospital open was the American managed University Hospital and its facilities were inadequate for even a fraction of those hurt.

Nanking’s streets were littered with dead. Sometimes bodies had to be moved before automobiles could pass.

The capture of Hsiakwan Gate by the Japanese was accompanied by the mass killing of the defenders, who were piled up among the sandbags, forming a mound six feet high. Late Wednesday the Japanese had not removed the dead, and two days of heavy military traffic had been passing through, grinding over the remains of men, dogs and horses.

The Japanese appear to want the horrors to remain as long as possible, to impress on the Chinese the terrible results of resisting Japan.

Chungahan Road was a long avenue of filth and discarded uniforms, rifles, pistols, machine guns, fieldpieces, knives and knapsacks. In some places the Japanese had to hitch tanks to debris to clear the road.

From F. Tillman, “All Captives Slain,” The New York Times, December 18, 1937, pp. 1, 10.


This text is part of the Internet Modern History Sourcebook. The Sourcebook is a collection of public domain and copy-permitted texts for introductory level classes in modern European and World history.

Unless otherwise indicated the specific electronic form of the document is copyright. Permission is granted for electronic copying, distribution in print form for educational purposes and personal use. If you do reduplicate the document, indicate the source. No permission is granted for commercial use of the Sourcebook.

(c)Paul Halsall Aug 1997
halsall@murray.fordham.edu

Related post:

Japanese Occupation survivors tell their stories

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