Singaporeans on buying sprees for Penang prewar houses; Residents see red


Singapore sweep continues

 Republic’s real estate hunters snapping up houses outside Penang’s heritage enclave.

GEORGE TOWN: Singaporean real estate hunters with a taste for prewar properties in Penang are still on buying sprees, says an NGO.

They are snapping up houses that are located just outside the state’s heritage enclave as these properties are not accorded heritage protection by Unesco, according to George Town Heritage Action.

The biggest buyer appears to be World Class Land (WCL), which is building the tallest residential skyscraper in the planet’s southern hemisphere.

Called Australia 108 because of its 108 storeys, the Melbourne development is expected to be completed in 2019.

WCL has since December 2013 reportedly snapped up 236 prewar houses in Penang, totalling more than 250,000sq ft – the equivalent of 26 football fields.

Recently, it applied to build a 46-storey condominium tower in Gurdwara Road, just 200m from Komtar after buying 37 prewar properties in that area.

Its latest block buy appears to be 26 prewar houses on Penang Road and Bertam Lane, also across from Komtar.

The properties were owned by six descendants of Tunku Kudin (1835- 1909), the great grand uncle of the late first prime minister, Tunku Abdul Rahman Putra Al-Haj, for nearly 100 years.

The offer from WCL was about RM980 per sq ft, totalling RM21mil.

Tengku Abdullah Tengku Mahadi, 61, who collected the monthly rent from the tenants on behalf of his 92-year-old father, said the deal was sealed in Thailand through one of the six heirs who spoke for all of them.

“All the heirs are in their late 80s and 90s. It will cost too much to develop the land ourselves.

“We didn’t really feel like selling. We know the new owner will change the whole place but we are all old and don’t want to stand in the way of development,” he told The Star.

He said the heirs only earned about RM50 per month from each unit when the Rent Control Act was in force.

After it was repealed in 1997, they raised the rent to about RM600 and it had stayed the same since.

WCL lawyers have sent eviction notices to the 60-odd tenants who have until end November to move out.

A subsidiary of Aspial Corporation Ltd, WCL has completed many projects in the island republic and Australia.

Aspial chief executive officer Koh Wee Seng is listed by Forbes this year as the 43rd richest man in Singapore.

George Town Heritage Action has been vociferously against the state government’s apparent lack of control over the alleged WCL buying sprees.

“This company’s business model is to buy the properties, evict the tenants, renovate or rebuild, and then drastically increase rentals,” said its co-founder Mark Lay.

At a press conference yesterday, he showed a list of 236 properties purportedly bought by WCL through several subsidiaries.

Totalling more than 250,000 sq ft, these include rows of old houses along 19 roads, including Dato Keramat, Macalister, Transfer and much of the Seven Streets precinct (known locally as Chit Tiau Lor) near Komtar.

Lay warned that if the state government allowed “one company to accumulate more than 230 prewar houses, it will kill diversity and people’s moral rights to the city”.

“Our concern is also socio-cultural. Any company can damage the fabric of George Town when they have a monopoly,” he added.

In June, The Star reported that Singaporean companies typically raise rentals by 400% to 500% after sprucing up the old houses.

In response, Penang Town and Country Planning Committee chairman Jagdeep Singh Deo had said that the state cannot interfere with free enterprise.

By Arnold Loh The Star/ANN

Penang residents see red over Singaporeans snapping up properties

 

GEORGE TOWN: Public anger in the state is on the rise as Singaporeans continue to buy up pre-war houses here by the blocks.

NGOs and netizens are reacting negatively following The Star Online’s Facebook posting of the news yesterday.

Many are calling for stricter measures to limit foreign buying, but Penang Citizens Chant Group legal adviser Yan Lee warned that it would be useless as foreigners could sidestep such restrictions by simply forming Malaysian shell companies with local directors who are proxies or trustees.

“The corporate veil will shield them from these simple stop-gap measures. Instead, these measures end up keeping out individual foreigners who earnestly want to own property here because they just want to live in Penang.

“The Penang government is more concerned about collecting development charges. The more it allows development, the more money it collects,” he lamented.

Yan Lee was commenting on cooling measures here since 2012 that prevent foreigners from buying landed property of less than RM2mil on the island and RM1mil on the mainland.

For stratified property, the cap is not less than RM1mil both on the island and the mainland.

There is also a state approval fee of 3% over the purchase price.

State Town and Country Planning Committee chairman Jagdeep Singh Deo said in a statement yesterday that statistics had shown that these measures had reduced foreign buying of Penang property by about 50% since 2013.

George Town Heritage Action held a press conference on Thursday to reveal that Singapore developer World Class Land (WCL) had acquired 236 pre-war houses in and around the heritage zone totalling about 250,000sq ft, equal to 26 football fields.

According to the annual report of WCL’s parent company, Aspial Corporation Ltd, the properties are held by six Malaysian companies – WCL (George Town) Holdings, WCL (Magazine), WCL (Macallum), WCL (Noordin), WCL (Bertam R) and WCL (Bertam L).

In the Companies Commission of Malaysia’s online portal, there are also company records of WCL (Malaysia) and WCL (Penang).

By Arnold Loh The Star/ANN

Related posts:

Rejuvenating George Town, Penang

 Oct 30, 2010 When I first set eyes on Penang, my first impression was green … Thus, if the
Northern Corridor can escape the middle income trap, then, …
 Feb 29, 2016 GEORGE TOWN: Penang has now overtaken the Klang Valley as the most
attractive place for property investment. In its Malaysia Commercial …

 Jun 5, 2016 WHILE the property market in Malaysia may be subdued, Penang is still
generating ….. Penang is best for property investment in Malaysia .

Aug 18, 2016 KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysia is no longer stuck in the middleincome trap, as its
gross national income (GNI) is now progressively growing …
 Jun 28, 2016 While young adults all over the world are renting homes, Malaysians prefer to own homes as soon as they get their first pay cheque. Instead of …

Landed residential properties much sought after with resilent demand, Market insights


CBRE|WTW managing director Foo Gee Jen (pic) said that in spite of confidence issues among property buyers, there was still good demand for “the right products,” especially for landed units.

PETALING JAYA: Demand for landed residential units is still promising despite the current property glut, said an official from a local real estate services provider.

CBRE|WTW managing director Foo Gee Jen (pic) said that in spite of confidence issues among property buyers, there was still good demand for “the right products,” especially for landed units.

“Despite the issue with the confidence levels, some developers are still registering good sales for landed and affordable homes. High rise developers meanwhile are having to offer a lot more freebies, with some even offering their own financing.

“But you don’t see that for landed property as the demand is still there,” he said at a press conference announcing the joint venture (JV) between real estate agencies CH Williams Talhar & Wong Sdn Bhd (WTW) and CBRE last week.

He emphasised that one of the biggest issues facing the current property sector is not oversupply, but instead a mismatch of supply and demand.

“Developers are putting the wrong products in the market and this is not what the masses want. The demand is there but it’s not the correct product. So the question is, how long will the market take to absorb (these products)?”

As an example of a mismatch between demand and supply, Foo cited low-cost housing in areas that were not accessible to the proper target audience.

“For instance, there are low-cost properties built in Bukit Beruntung. But the daily toll and fuel cost of travelling to Kuala Lumpur for work is heavy for the type of people living in such homes.

“Also, there are so many high-end shoebox units now and Malaysia is unlike Singapore or Hong Kong. We still have plenty of land. If you’re putting the right property in the right location – you’ll still see a long queue of people attending the launches.”

CBRE, the world’s largest commercial real estate services firm and a Fortune 500 company, announced yesterday that it had acquired a significant interest in Malaysia’s largest real estate service provider, WTW, WTW Real Estate Sdn Bhd and WTW Property Services Sdn Bhd.

The business will rebrand as CBRE|WTW effective immediately, with WTW holding a 51% stake in the JV. WTW network of 13 offices in Peninsula Malaysia.

CBRE Asia Pacific chief executive officer Steve Swerdlow said the collaboration was consistent with the firm’s strategy to grow in South-East Asia.

“At a time when planning is underway to link Malaysia and Singapore via high speed rail and with the Asean Economic Community and the Trans Pacific Partnership facilitating greater collaboration for both countries and their wider partner countries, this offers many opportunities for cross border activities when they arise.”

With CBRE as a strategic partner, Foo said the firm can now help its clients expand their activities beyond Malaysia, providing them with more options through a diverse means of expertise. “Conversely we can be a party to help bring greater meaningful inbound investments into the Malaysian market via the CBRE global network.”

By Eugene Mahalingam The Star

Top Story -market insights
An outlook on Malaysia’s property market

May 26, 2016
According to PropertyGuru’s Malaysia Property Market Sentiment
Survey Report H1 2016, things are expected to improve in 2016 as people
are warming up to the idea of purchasing properties.  

Read full story 

Related posts:

 Nov 14, 2015 PETALING JAYA: Penang’s property market is expected to stay resilient on the back of sustained demand, especially from Penangites working …
Penang has dislodged Kuala Lumpur’s Golden Tringle as the top
investment choice GEORGE TOWN: Penang has now overtaken the Klang

May 18, 2015 Property market is 10 years, boom and burst cycle: 1998, 2008 and ….. Ma: 20 more years of enviable growth for China In an interview with the…


 Malaysian property market correction to continue in 2016 …

May 7, 2016 Lim expected property prices to plateau for the next few years before the next upcycle. … Labels: 25 years economic cycles , investments , Malaysia …..

 

 Experts share insights on  property market in  Malaysia

May 10, 2016 Malaysia’s Q3 Property Market Update Check your risk appetite and start …correction to continue in 2016, its economic cycles the past 25 years …..

Featured image: Sourced from Propertyhunter.com.my

Share this Image On Your Site

<p><strong>Please include attribution to
http://www.propertyguru.com.my with this graphic.</strong><br
/><br /><a
href=http://www.propertyguru.com.my/property-news/2016/5/126220/an-insiders-look-into-malaysias-property-market><img

src=http://cdn-cms.pgimgs.com/news/2016/05/Infographic-Insider-Look-Into-Property-Market.jpeg
alt=An-Insiders-Look-Into-the-Property-Market-H1-2016-Infographic
width=540px border=0 /></a></p>

House buyers’ traps: purchasers lose their homes because of defaulting developers


WHY does this keep happening to house buyers in Malaysia?

This incident happened two years ago in Taiping where a laid-back community of mainly retirees found the roof over their heads nearly, and in some cases, actually, blown away. The purchasers had paid the developer and had moved into their houses and lived there for 10 years. Problem was that the purchasers paid the developers in cash remittance without taking out end-financing loans.

Unknown to the purchasers, the developer did not pay the developer’s bank to settle the developer’s loan vide bridging loans. The developer’s charge remained and grew into bigger indebtedness to the bank.

Apparently, the developer’s bank had not been collecting payment of the loan from the developer, even as the developer was collecting the instalments of the purchase price from the purchasers, as provided in the sale & purchase agreement (S&P) schedule.

Having waited for 10 years for the developer to settle his loan, the bank realised that the developer was not going to pay; that foreclosure was unavoidable.

The bank had a problem. Apart from the developer’s loan having ballooned over the years because of the bank’s laxity in not insisting on the developer paying promptly, there was also political repercussion. There are a few issues here, namely, the destruction of a settled community in a pleasant location, the injustice of the S&P; the solicitousness for developers in preference to purchasers on the part of the powers that be; and the embarrassment resulting from the bank’s philanthropic ramifications.

Has the bank breached the fiduciary duty of care to the purchasers as the bridging loan financier to the defaulting developer?

The crux of the problem is that the Housing Ministry-prescribed S&P allows the developer to build the purchaser’s house with the instalments of the purchase price paid by the purchaser from the day the S&P is signed. On top of this, and even more seriously, the developer is allowed to borrow from the developer’s banks on the security of the purchaser’s property.

Where a purchaser has paid the purchase price in full to the developer, and the developer does not pay the developer’s loan secured by the purchaser’s property, the developer’s bank may foreclose, auction off the purchaser’s property to recover the developer’s loan.

The developer suffers nothing. It has received the purchase price and pocketed it. The developer borrowed from its bank and gave the purchaser’s property as security, and with foreclosure the developer’s bank recovers its loan, and so the developer owes no money to the bank. It takes no risk, suffers no loss.

Purchasers the victims

It is the purchaser who loses. He loses his house and he has to settle the loan he took to buy the house with increasing interest on it. He is blacklisted, which means he can never borrow again. He may never buy a house again! Is this fair to the buyer who never did anything wrong to the developer or to the developer’s bank? In the Taiping housing fiasco, some of the purchasers had to buy their houses again at prices bloated by 10 years’ arrears of interest (i.e. pay the developer’s debt) to stave off foreclosure.

Who is to blame for this sad state of affairs? We will consider each one in turn. The most obvious candidate is, of course, the developer. Not so. It is the Housing Ministry for providing a standard form S&P that allows this to happen. Firstly, the S&P allows the developer to borrow money from a bank with a charge on the whole housing development land before it is sub-divided and sold. This pre-sale loan is referred to in the recitals to the S&P. This is understandable as the developer needs money before sale. The result of this is that the purchaser buys an encumbered property but the purchaser is not told how much of the developer’s loan, if apportioned equally, is borne by each purchaser’s sub-divided land (the redemption sum). After sale, the developer collects money from the purchaser from the day the S&P is signed, and should be able to make use of it to meet all the expenses of the development. However, after the sub-divided land is sold, the developer keeps borrowing, and no effort is made to keep the purchaser informed about the increasing amount of the developer’s loan/ the redemption sum.

The purchaser’s consent to the additional, post-sale loans is taken for granted. In fact, the purchaser cannot withhold his consent as long as the purchaser receives some fig-leaf protection from the developer’s bank in the form of an undertaking not to foreclose.

What is the use to the purchaser of the developer’s bank’s undertaking not to foreclose? What the purchaser needs is the absolute undertaking by the developer and the developer’s bank that a purchaser who has paid the purchase price will not face foreclosure vis-à-vis the disclaimer(s). This would have helped the Taiping purchasers. It is, therefore, a matter between the developer’s bank and the developer, with the Housing Ministry playing the proper protective role required of it by law, to ensure that such an undertaking/ disclaimer is given by the developer’s bank to the purchaser. This and other issues arising from the S&P have been raised by HBA with the Housing Ministry which continues to procrastinate.

To the developer’s bank, the loans to the developer on the security of the purchaser’s land is regarded as if it is the developer’s property entirely; it is of no concern to the developer’s bank that some of the purchasers have paid the developer and the developer may or may not have forwarded some of these payments to the developer’s bank.

The developer’s bank’s concern is whether the whole loan has been settled by the developer-borrower. If not, the developer’s bank feels secure in the knowledge that the entire housing development land is available to the developer’s bank to recover its loan/s. In so far as the developer’s bank is concerned, payments made by each purchaser to the developer is of no consequence. The transaction between the bank and the developer is the one that matters.

Under the then S&P, there is also no control over how much the developer should be allowed to borrow, for what purpose and by when it should be settled. Each loan to the developer increases the risks to the purchaser.

In the recent past, developer’s borrowed only for the purpose of meeting the expenses of the housing development. The developer was allowed to borrow twice only – once before sale and once after sale. Although the developer was not required to disclose the redemption sum, there was a very important safeguard. And that is, the developer had to settle the redemption sum to the developer’s bank before completion of construction so that at the end of the 24- or 36-month construction period, as the case may be, the property was free from the developer’s encumbrances and safe from foreclosure, even if the property was not transferred to the purchaser just as promptly. It was at least safe from foreclosure.

Bank initiatives

Banks/financial institutions should take the initiative to recover progressively the loan it had given the developer. Banks should stipulate as a condition for giving loans to their customers (developers) that the latter open its Housing Development Account (HDA), a statutory requirement, with the same bank and require the instalments of the purchase price be paid into it, and authorise the bank to deduct the developer’s loan by instalments from the HDA so that when the purchaser completes payment, the developer’s loan is also settled.

There is no such statutory requirement in the S&P so that if it happens at all, it’s serendipity!

HBA had meetings with the Housing Ministry to propose changes to the law and S&P with the view of giving greater protection to purchasers within the framework of the sell-and-build (which Rehda defend so fervently) but some pertinent ones had been objected by Rehda.

As if that is not enough, the ministry too have rejected those proposals vis-a-vis pre-determination of redemption sums in the S&P transaction. And that notwithstanding the Housing Development Act 1966 stating that it is inter alia for “the protection of the interests of purchaser.”

The next continuing article will dwell on the new “protection” or whatever in lieu thereof approved by the Attorney-General’s Chambers vis-à-vis “redemptions and disclaimers”.

Buyers beware by Chang Kim Loong

Chang Kim Loong is secretary-general of the National House Buyers Association: http://www.hba.org.my, a non-profit, non-governmental organisation.

Related posts:

 Nov 15, 2014 By CHANG KIM LOONG – Buyers Beware The Star Nov 15 2014. Chang Kim Loong is the honorary secretary-general of the National House …

 Feb 1, 2015 By Chang Kim Loong AMN who is the secretary-general of the National House Buyers Association. Related posts: Who is responsible: …

 

 Home, sweet home for young couples will lead to …

 Oct 12, 2014 HBA secretary-general Chang Kim Loong also said the housing scheme for young married couples was commendable. However Chang said …

 

 Oct 14, 2014 Its secretary-general, Chang Kim Loong, said speculators have taken advantage of the low entry cost of buying a property at the expense of …

Malaysian home prices may go up 5~8%; heart-warming CNY family ties with EcoWorld 全家福


From Left :- Director of Valuation Services Chee Kok Thim , Rahim & Co Executive Chairman Senator Tan Sri Dato’ Abdul Rahim Abdul Rahman, DIrector Real Estate Agency Robert Ang and Director of Research & Strategic Planning Sulaiman Saheh after Press conference and Q&A session – Review on Malaysian Property Market and the prospects of 2016 – on Thursday Feb 4 2016.

KUALA LUMPUR: The property market is expected to remain challenging, with the hike in house prices slowing to between 5% and 8% this year, compared with 7% to 10% last year.

Rahim & Co Chartered Surveyors Sdn Bhd director Sulaiman Akhmady Mohd Saheh expects prices to rise but sees only marginal price gains for the residential sector.

“Depending on location and type of property, some may see price consolidation as the gap between sellers’ asking prices is closing towards the buyers’ expected prices,” he said during the firm’s property market review.

He said that there were concerns that the number of transactions may drop this year, as new property launches could face more challenges and slower take-up.

He said that based on average annual household incomes to the price of average terraced homes, housing affordability could have slightly improved last year compared with 2014 although house prices in general continued to increase.

“Nevertheless, housing affordability is still a big concern especially in urban centres and major towns throughout the country.

“The ratio improved from 3.6 in 2014 to 3.4 last year, which indicates that an average terraced house would cost an average household or family in Malaysia 3.4 times its annual gross income,” said executive chairman Tan Sri Abdul Rahim Abdul Rahman.

Note that the least affordable terraced house in Malaysia last year was in Sabah, with a 5.7 times ratio, Penang, 5.3 times, Kuala Lumpur, 5.2 times and Sarawak, at 4.5 times.

He said that home ownership continued to be beyond the reach of many Malaysians, especially the younger generation.

“The ratio indicate that generally our houses are still moderately unaffordable. For Sabah, Penang and Kuala Lumpur, average prices of terraced houses are even categorised as severely unaffordable,” he said.

He added that the pace of construction and completion for affordable housing needed to be improved in order to address the issue of affordability.

“It is progressing but there should be more effort, for example in PR1MA. Among these, PR1MA is to provide 175,000 units where 74,399 units are currently in various stages of construction. “At present, only 10,000 units is due to be completed by the end of the year.

“That 74,399 units under construction should be intensified instead of completing 10,000 units by the end of the year,” he noted.

For the commercial sector, particularly the office sector, it will still remain challenging as absorption of new supply coming into the market is expected to slow down.

More office buildings are expected to undergo refurbishment to prevent tenants from relocating to newer office buildings.

However, there are concerns on whether the retail property sector might be heading into a glut in supply as a number of malls are being launched within Klang Valley.

Last year, retail sales were affected by the goods and services tax, which was implemented from April as well as a weakening ringgit, driving up costs and lowering consumer spending.

By Nadya Ngui The Star/Asia News Network

Related:

Despite gloomy property sector share price of some property companies could rise

Heartwarning CNY video on family ties goes viral

//players.brightcove.net/4405352765001/default_default/index.html?videoId=4735800122001

Building strong ties: A video grab from EcoWorld’s ‘Family Portraits’ on its official YouTube page captures the essence of maintaining family values.

PETALING JAYA: A heart-warming Chinese New Year video showing a man’s life as seen through his family photographs has been released by EcoWorld Development Group Bhd.

The three-minute video titled Family Portraits, which can be seen on YouTube, has been viewed more than 78,000 times so far yesterday. It is meant to educate the viewer on maintaining strong family values. The video shows glimpses of the man’s life-long journey from early childhood until adulthood.

All throughout, viewers will notice that family plays a huge role in the main character’s life as he encounters the pivotal moments in life that are familiar to many of us. The loving embrace of his family is never too far away even as he grows up and leaves his parents to pursue a career and start a family of his own.

Family Portraits successfully conveys its message through very little dialogue, relying mostly on visual images that reflect the mood and spirit of the central theme of the video.

The touching video, while light hearted and filled with funny moments, sends a strong message that clearly emphasises the importance of family ties and the togetherness that is an integral part of the Chinese New Year festival.

“The love of a family is life’s greatest blessing. This Chinese New Year, capture the warmth and happiness with a family portrait and start a collection of beautiful memories to look back on for generations to come,” posted the company on its YouTube page.

Those who wish to view the video may do so at EcoWorld’s official YouTube page.

Earlier this week, the company announced that it was offering a special Chinese New Year treat for buyers of the few remaining units of EcoWorld’s Eco Meadow Phase 1 homes by giving rebates of RM22,888 on top of an additional 5% early bird rebate from now until Feb 22.

Related:

EcoWorld – Creating Tomorrow & Beyond

http://ecoworld.my/

Related posts:

Liew and his son Tian Xiong (left) at the interview. The biggest shareholder of Eco World Development Group is
Tian Xiong, who at 22 in 2…

Good infrastructure determines property value


Sound advice: Lee delivering his talk at the Star Property Fair 2015 in Queensbay Mall, Penang.


GOOD infrastructure plays an important role in determining the value of properties.

Zeon Properties chief executive officer Leon Lee said even US president Barrack Obama stressed the link between infrastructure and a healthy economy.

“According to Obama, a sound infrastructure helps create new jobs, increase business opportunities and facilitating the movement of business,” he said during his talk on ‘Market Outlook 2015: Investing in Uncertain Times’.

“When the second link connecting Johor and Singapore was ready in 1998, the value of properties in the surrounding areas rose 100 times from RM2 psf in 1994 to RM211.

“Similarly when the Shenzhen Bay Bridge was ready in 2008, the value of the properties in Hong Kong and New Territories increased to RM2,870 psf in 2013 from RM470 psf in 1988,” he said.

In Penang, when the second link connecting Batu Maung and Batu Kawan was ready in 2014, the terraced properties in Batu Kawan increased to RM430,000 in 2014 from RM180,000 in 2008.

“In 2007, a terrace house in Batu Maung was worth about RM700,000. But now, a similar unit is priced at RM1.4mil,” he said.

Homebuyers also got an insight on how to get their housing loan approved by Miichael Yeoh.

“One must understand how the process works and if it’s done systematically, it will not get rejected,” he said in his ‘How to Get Your Loan Approved’ talk.

Property investor-cum-author B.K. Khoo said property was an appreciating asset and such investment could generate passive income.

He said effective time management, money and building the right knowledge were keys in sound property investment.

“Don’t wait to buy a property. Buy a property and then wait.

“And remember, your network is your net worth. Try to look around and you will get people to contribute to your success and net worth,” he said in his talk ‘How You Can Be The Next 9 to 5 Property Millionaire?’

Related post:

22 Jul 2013
… The road to huge profits. Packed room: Lee giving his talk on ‘Infrastructure goes a long way when picking the best property’ during The Star Property Fair 2013 at G Hotel, Penang. http://www.zeon.com.my/index.html …… The value of M&A deals in the first half of this year exceeded US$300bil (RM1.3 trillion), an increase of more than 60% over the same period last year, which had already set the record for the first half year. Perhaps most significantly, China and the …

Banding together for unity, AnakAnak Malaysia


National pride: EcoWorld’s father and son team Tian Xiong (left) and Kee Sin proudly wearing the campaign’s wristbands.

It has been more than a month since the #AAnakAnakMalaysia campaign started and today marks the final day of the simple yet meaningful campaign.

What started out as a campaign to unite Malaysians and uphold the spirit of independence quickly grew and flooded social media, especially with images of the people creatively expressing their patriotism using the campaign’s signature #AnakAnakMalaysia wristband.

Together, two proud Malaysian companies – EcoWorld Develop­ment Group Bhd and Star Media Group Bhd (formerly Star Publications (M) Bhd) – banded together to remind us what it means to be Malaysian and to look beyond skin, cultural background, race and creed.

The campaign stands firm in its belief that embracing diversity is key to success and with millions of shares of pictures with the hashtag (at www.anakanakmalaysia.com), it was evident that the campaign struck a chord in the hearts of Malaysians.

Wong (left) beaming with pride as he shows his solidarity with Malaysians.

The Star sat down with EcoWorld chairman Tan Sri Liew Kee Sin, executive director Liew Tian Xiong and Star Media Group Bhd group managing director and chief executive officer Datuk Seri Wong Chun Wai to hear from them the journey of the campaign towards Malaysia Day and its impact.

Tian Xiong said the response to the #AnakAnakMalaysia campaign was beyond what was imagined.

When coming up with a Merdeka-Malaysia Day campaign, he said the group branding team had wanted to do something different.

“Over the years, we realised that fewer flags are being waved. We just wanted to do something significant and remind people that there is a lot to look forward to in this country,” he said.

Although there were about 20,000 pictures shared through the hashtag, Tian Xiong said the total number of shares accumulated to about six million across all social media platforms.

“Everyone was posting pictures –no matter where they were. There were so many creative pictures,” he said.

Tian Xiong’s favourite so far has been the one where a father uses his fingers to form the shape of a heart on his pregnant wife’s belly, signifying the coming of an “Anak Malaysia”.

The campaign drew attention in the media with Tian Xiong even getting personal feedback.

“Everyone has been saying that it’s a good campaign. We made 480,000 wristbands for this and there are still people asking for more,” he said, adding that he always made it a point to pass these to his friends whenever they met up for their weekly football games.

“I’ve never been embarrassed to be a Malaysian. This country has a lot to offer and it gives you character.

“Even when I was studying abroad, I always wanted to come back,” he said.

Growing up, Tian Xiong said being tolerant of other races came naturally, particularly when he was surrounded by people of various ethnic groups every day.

His father Kee Sin said as a parent, the key was to teach children to respect each other, not to look at skin colour, and to embrace diversity.

“Parents should let their children mix and mingle with different races and Malaysians should make friends, rekindle friendships and not stay within their own boundaries,” he said.

In EcoWorld, he said diversity was their theme, which was embraced by all employees.

Growing up in Plentong New Village, he said it never mattered what race each child in the football field was then as everyone just bonded over the sport.

He believes that the reason for such troubled times in the country is because people have taken the country’s richness in culture, race, and religions for granted.

Leaders, he said, should now think of ways to move forward.

A proud Malaysian, he said he always did his little part in placing Malaysia on the world map whenever he travelled.

“I always make it clear to everyone I meet where I come from and will continue to remind people,” he said, adding that overseas, it did not matter what one’s race was as everyone identified themselves as Malaysians.

Wong agreed with EcoWorld that the response to the campaign had been overwhelmingly successful.

“The National Day-Malaysia Day campaign struck a chord with all layers of Malaysians because the majority of us are tired of race politicians and, certainly, disconnected politicians who use race and religion to ensure their survival.

“This is not what most moderate Malaysians want for this country. Malaysians want to celebrate these two great days, not mark these important dates with fear.

“We must be able to go to the streets on Aug 31 and Sept 16 in a celebration of joy. These two dates are about Malaysians of all races, religions and cultures coming together as one people,” he said.

It was shocking, he added, that some had chosen to draw and emphasise on the differences – whether real or imaginary.

Wong said they got daily calls from Malaysians wanting to be part of the initiative and, regardless of race, he could see the genuine joy and pride each time they put on the wristbands.

“We share this joy for our little part in making history for Malaysia.

“It was truly a people’s initiative to spread the word of moderation and we hope to carry out a similar collaboration next year where, again, all Malaysians can make a simple statement of their love for our Malaysia which we truly love,” he said.

BY KATHLEEN MICHAEL The Star

Related posts

Ten months after S P Setia Bhd unveiled its succession plan, head honcho Tan Sri Liew Kee Sin has announced his intention to resign as …
25 Apr 2015
Liew and his son Tian Xiong (left) at the interview. The biggest shareholder of Eco World Development Group is Tian Xiong, who at 22 in 2013 became the major shareholder of the company. Entrepreneur who drives the …
22 Jan 2014
Liew’s eldest son, Tian Xiong, is a major shareholder and director in Eco World, another property firm set up by former S P Setia top brass. S P Setia fell five sen to close at RM2.88 while Eco World was up one sen to RM4.15.
21 Jul 2015
“Property development companies such as E&O, Eco World Development Group Bhd and Ewein Bhd are embarking on new large-scale mixed development projects in the state with total gross development value (GDV) of …
30 Sep 2014
The developers who took part in the exhibition were Eco World Development Sdn Bhd, SP Setia Bhd Group, IJM Properties Sdn Bhd, Asas Mutiara Sdn Bhd, Chong Company Sdn Bhd, Sunway Grand Sdn Bhd, BSG Property, …

By-laws governing strata property in Malaysia, part 3


General prohibitions of a proprietor according to the Third Schedule of Strata Management Regulation 2015

A PROPRIETOR shall not use his strata parcel for any purposes, illegal or otherwise, which may be injurious to the reputation of the development area; use as fuel of any substance or material which may give rise to smoke or fumes or obnoxious smells or shall not use any substance which the management corporation in a general meeting shall decide; and throw or allow to fall, any refuse or rubbish of any description on the common property or any part thereof except in refuse bins maintained by him or in refuse chutes or in refuse bins in common refuse chambers provided in the building.

PROHIBITION OF NUISANCE
A proprietor shall not use language or behave in a manner likely to cause offence or embarrassment or nuisance to any other proprietor or to any person lawfully using the common property.

APPEARANCE, FAÇADE AND COLOUR OF EXTERIOR
A proprietor shall not change the appearance, colour code and façade to any part on the exterior of his parcel without the prior written approval of the management corporation and, where necessary, the approval of the appropriate authority.

PEST CONTROL
A proprietor shall take all necessary steps to prevent his parcel from infestation by termites, vermin, rodents, pests and insects provided that any netting installed shall first be approved by the management corporation.

KEEPING OF ANIMALS IN A RESIDENTIAL BUILDING
A proprietor shall not keep any particular animal in his strata parcel or on the common property thereof that may cause annoyance or nuisance to the other proprietors or which may be dangerous to the safety or health of the other proprietors or which contravenes any written law or rules and regulations of the relevant state or the local authority.

DRYING OF LAUNDRY
In a building used for residential or dwelling purposes, a proprietor shall not, except with the prior written approval of the management corporation, hang any washing, towel, bedding, clothing or other article on any part of his strata parcel in such a way as to protrude outside, other than at the areas designated for such purpose and leave them there only for a reasonable period.

IDENTIFICATION FOR SECURITY PURPOSES
The management corporation may require any person on the common property to identify himself for security purposes and any person who refuses to comply and who is not a proprietor to leave the common property or the development area immediately.

PROHIBITION OF OBSTRUCTION
All fire escape routes, including but not limited to, the stairways, landings and passageways in the building or the common property shall not be obstructed by the proprietor at any time and the management corporation may, without prior notice, remove or confiscate any property of a proprietor, including but not limited to, bicycles, potted plants, vases, furniture, trolleys, boxes,goods or objects of any kind whatsoever. The management corporation may put up a notice of any removed or confiscated property which may be claimed by the proprietor within fourteen days from date of the notice subject to payment to the management corporation of a charge not exceeding RM200. If a removed or confiscated property is not claimed at the expiry of the period of fourteen days, the management corporation may discard or dispose of such property as it deems fit without any liability to the proprietor.

GARDEN, LAWNS AND POTTED PLANTS
A proprietor shall not damage any lawn, trees, shrubs, plants or flowers in the common property.

ENCROACHMENT ON COMMON PROPERTY AND OTHER PARCELS
A proprietor shall not do anything to his strata parcel which may encroach on any part of the common property or any other strata parcels. A proprietor shall not mark, paint, put up posters or banners or notices, drive nails or screws, or fasten brackets or the like into, or otherwise damage or deface, any part of the common property except with the prior written approval of the management corporation. An approval given by the management corporation shall not authorise any addition(s) to the common property.

VEHICLES
Every vehicle shall be properly parked in the designated parking bay without causing any obstruction to any adjacent vehicle or the flow of traffic. An improperly parked vehicle may be towed away or wheel-clamped by the management corporation, at the vehicle owner’s cost without prior notice, and in such a case, the wheel clamp will only be removed after payment to the management corporation of a charge imposed by the management corporation which shall not exceed RM200, and with any towing cost and holding charge actually incurred by the management corporation.

SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL
A proprietor shall not cause any unsightly accumulation of dirt, garbage, rubbish or debris in his strata parcel and accessory parcel that is visible from the outside and affecting the appearance or façade of the building or common property.

RENOVATION WORKS AND REPAIRS
A proprietor shall not carry out any renovation works to his strata parcel without first obtaining a prior written approval from the management corporation and, where necessary, from the appropriate authority.

RESTRICTIONS IN RENOVATION WORKS
Unless prior approval in writing has been obtained from the appropriate authority and the management corporation, a proprietor shall not:
• construct another floor level to his strata parcel (e.g. to split the level of any portion of the existing floor in the strata parcel by adding platforms);
• relocate any external door or window of his strata parcel;
• remove or make changes to any building safety feature in his strata parcel and notwithstanding such approvals, the proprietor shall indemnify and keep indemnified the management corporation against any liability which may be incurred or suffered as a result of such removal;
• shift any plumbing and sewerage system in a strata parcel;
• change or upgrade the whole electrical system in a strata parcel; or
• illegally connect or tap electricity supply.

POWER OF THE MANAGEMENT CORPORATION 

Where the condition of any strata parcel(s) in the development area affects or is likely to affect the support or shelter provided by that parcel for another parcel in the same building or the common property, or causes or is likely to cause damage or destruction to another parcel or any property therein in the same building or the common property; and the proprietor of the parcel in that condition has neglected or refused within a reasonable time of two written notifications of at least fourteen days each from the management corporation to take such action as is necessary to have that condition rectified; the management corporation may, as agent for the proprietor of the parcel in that condition, take such actions and proceedings as are necessary to have that condition rectified and the management corporation may recover the cost and expense of such actions and proceedings from the proprietor of the parcel in that condition as a debt due to the management corporation.

CHANGES TO BY-LAWS 

A developer during the developer’s management period may make additional by-laws or make amendments to such additional bylaws, not inconsistent with the bylaws in the Third Schedule, with the approval of the Commissioner of Building.

A joint management body may, by a special resolution, make additional by-laws or make amendments to such additional bylaws, not inconsistent with the bylaws in the Third Schedule, for regulating the control, management, administration, use and enjoyment of the building or land intended for subdivision into parcels and the common property, including all or any of the following matters:
• safety and security measures; • details of any common property of which the use is restricted;
• the keeping of pets;
• parking; • floor coverings;
• refuse control;
• behaviour;
• architectural and landscaping guidelines to be observed by all strata parcel owners; and
• imposition of a fine, not exceeding RM200 against any parcel owner, occupant or invitee who is in breach of any of the by-laws.

Follow our article next week on The Strata Management Tribunal, highlighting criminalising nonpayment of service charges.

BY DATUK PRETAM SINGH DARSHAN SINGH, The Sun

Related posts:

%d bloggers like this: